SOS_20-01
Revolutionary Bodies
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Anonymous 1
SOS_20
Revolutionary Bodies is a blueprint for a library of, and for, the British South Asian LGBTQ+ diaspora. Analysis of TikTok, Reddit and other platforms shows that information and resources used by the community are locked within generational silos. Rarely extending between age groups, communication takes place only rarely, exacerbated by the divergent social platforms used.
SOS_20-02
Walk With You
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Anonymous 2
SOS_20
The government of Hong Kong recently weaponized language through the passing of the National Security Law, sparking fear of criminalisation within the population. Citizens have abandoned the use of written language and have instead resorted to expressing their opinion through blank pieces of paper left on the blank walls of buildings and on empty escalator tunnels. The meaning of these blank squares have become a symbol of expression of freedom. In a city where expression is so constrained, what collective means of communication and protest could be deployed?
SOS_20-03
Give it Arrest
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Peter
Brooks
SOS_20
Give it Arrest is a design for direct action, to ‘tell the truth’ on Extinction Rebellion’s flawed theory of social change. While their use of theatrical mass arrest may have successfully declared the emergency, we still need to avert it. All too often protests fade away but the climate crisis will not. Without the time to wait for another movement, how should Extinction Rebellion evolve?
SOS_20-04
Abyssal Bluff
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Andrew
Copolov
SOS_20
The project investigates the CEO of a deep-sea mining company, and an architect building a floating city; two figures who claim that their work will protect the planet from climate catastrophe. The project investigates the threat posed by these men and their fictions of salvation. It is unlikely that resource extraction can occur within ethical ecological and social constraints; but through moral alibis and sweet nothings the frontierists will sustain.
SOS_20-05
Human Capital Harvest
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Bex
Liu
SOS_20
A methodology that performs an alternative reading of western media and state response. This project developed from a discomfort around the western state and media response to the on-going situation in Hong Kong around human rights, freedom of speech, and false acts of post-colonial reconciliation.
SOS_20-06
The Glitch Justice Review
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Rosemary
Moss
SOS_20
The Glitch Justice Review, taking the form of a government white paper, sets out the phases required to redirect the justice system toward more restorative models of justice, by surrendering to a digital operation and the glitches they bring with them. The white paper itself, is a glitch - a typical-atypical ministerial document, it dresses down exciting ideas in bogus equations, reductive qualitative data sets, itemising, dull, euphemistic or detached language, simplistic word generated diagrams, aphorisms and a mix of falsified and real references.
SOS_20-07
Inside the Belly of the Beast
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Okocha
Obasi
SOS_20
Presented here is one artifact of the ongoing critical investigation between myths, time travel, and social issues of the 21st century. This project showcases 5 unrelated objects, collected and featured at the British Museum. Conjuring a story illustrating the magical narrative of how Africa was removed from the world and sent to Saturn before its colonisation, Inside the Belly of the Beast depicts a contemporary allo history.
SOS_20-08
Guardian Architects
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Jonathan
Pilosof
SOS_20
By interrogating the existing scope of an architect, this body of work poses the question: how can we move away from the culture of cheap, shiny, but harmful new buildings? The future of architecture must focus not only on retrofit, but designing-for-retrofit. A new scope - the Guardian Architect - must be formed to save buildings from being turned to dust.
SOS_20-10
The Hyperobjective
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Louis
Scantlebury
SOS_20
Hyperobjective is a video game that lets you experience the hyperobject. The narrative; a real-time interactive simulation of earth’s next 2000 years of projected sea-level rise. The game uses a second player POV, a 2000-year gameplay loop and the Death Button to foster a new form of subjectivity among a community of players.
SOS_20-11
कोठार [Ko-tth-aar] The Storeroom
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Sharvaree
Shirode
SOS_20
“I am The Storeroom. I have changed a lot over the years; I used to be a useful room, lively and full of laughter. There were daily movements. Now it is dark here all the time.” Through the words of Sharvaree’s grandmother, Aaji, and the lens of ‘Kotthar’, this project brings alive obsolete objects from the traditional Indian kitchen that have been kept locked away for decades. These are objects that represent identity, history and immense cultural value, but rarely see the light of day. Why? Has the way of life replaced the objects that are used, or have the objects defined this cultural change?
SOS_20-12
Home Office // Lockdown Commute
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Roxy
Zeiher
SOS_20
The change of location is key for leaving the private self at home and getting into character of the “full blood professional”. Without this transition time, the boundaries between private and professional self are fluid and undistinguishable. Lockdown Commute addresses this lack of spatial shift and provides a method to reassert the sacredness of professionalism within the home office.The performative nature aims to comment on today's tendency towards solutionhalism and liberates its user from self imposed and briefed notions of professionalism.
SOS_19-01
Google Plaque
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Callum
Abbott
SOS_19
In response to NASA’s past attempts to communicate with extra-terrestrials, corporations look to communicate their unique view of the world to other potential life forms that may inhabit the universe. What will be the artefacts of this new space race, and what do they tell us about the future of a new society which is founded by values of corporations over nation-states?
SOS_19-02
Protest Tactics
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Elsa
Casanova
SOS_19
This project seeks to collate and disseminate existing methods of protest. By studying their deployment and gamifying the knowledge base, players can understand the socio-political context of such events, their impact and create accessible tools to easily replicate old and discover new forms of protest.
SOS_19-03
Star Shopping
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Thea
Christy-Parker
SOS_19
This is a speculation about a not-so-distant future in which high streets have been conquered by online retail giants. For example, Amazon moved in and created a network of star shops which sell only 5 star items (or 1 star items, etc.). Some star ratings did better in certain neighbourhoods, and it became hard to find particular items. The shop’s products were curated by algorithms which led to huge amounts of waste. They also had technical flaws which were exploited by both individuals and companies who worked to influence the rating and price of products.
SOS_19-05
INTERNET(S)
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Kostek
Konopinski
SOS_19
Google makes use of complex algorithms which tailors internet content to every user; aiming to increase the efficiency of advertisement. This algorithm takes into account 57 different factors, including non-cookie data. As a result, internet users become closed in filter bubbles in which they are exposed only to content that is personalised for them. People no longer see content that they might disagree with, closing digital environments and radicalising their users. The end of the internet is neigh! As a single entity, the internet is obsolete and the creation of separate webs, reflecting the divisions between users is an inevitability.
SOS_19-06
Sugar Baby Starter Pack
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Karolina
Krupickova
SOS_19
This project explores the complex power dynamics surrounding ‘Sugar Babying’, a practice of contemporary escort made possible through digital platforms. Is there equality in the relationships fostered and how can we challenge our own behaviour toward these roles? Nearly 500,000 students in the UK are struggling to pay for their education and seeking wealthy benefactors (“Sugar Daddies”) to help offset the costs.
SOS_19-07
Notes by Unknown Author
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Lily
McCraith
SOS_19
Notes by Unknown Author. A discarded pile of notes and a business card found on the street become the starting point for an investigation. Deciphering the unknown author’s handwriting reveals a hidden language of places, minerals, processes and strategy, specific to the mining industry. Layers of abstraction mask the reality of the geopolitics, ecological violence, and exploitation of workers who mine conflict minerals.
SOS_19-08
Bank Tube Station 2022
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Christian
Opdal
SOS_19
We use our phones on an everyday basis. On them are an increasing amount of applications for everything. We can be occupied by our phones for hours, both time-consuming and entertaining we are drawn to them as the one-stop shop for social interaction and everyday needs. Applications like City mapper and Google Maps enable us to move from A to B in the fastest way possible, making the device a practical and time-efficient tool. With the increasing development of augmented reality, a technology which trended through Pokemon GO in 2016, we have seen a new possibility for the use of our phones. This illustration of Bank tube-station presents a vision of our future use for mobile technology. In our scenario, a highly path-efficient andultra-monetizing and movement-regulating vice governs your movements in and around the city.
SOS_19-09
I (Action)
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Eleni
Papazoglou
SOS_19
How does terminology affect how we perceive ourselves as professionals? This project focuses on terminology surrounding labour; treating language as infrastructure which effects pay, legislation and self-perception. Unpacking how vocational terminology is formed with regards to: 1.ownership (ex. The proletariat), 2.skills (ex. Unskilled), 3.profession (ex. Engineer), and conditions of labour (ex. The precariat), it aims to reclaim terminological systems to promote self-identification.
SOS_19-10
Fahrenheit 0010101101…
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Jay
Parekh
SOS_19
Fahrenheit 0010101101… investigates the cultivation of identity through digital platforms, and the curated experience that they provide. Reddit and other media platforms quarantining information solves their PR problems, but only adds to the current polarised discourse. Such platforms create a hyper-curated drip feed of content, tailored to the individual. The project speculates that there will come a time when we not only allow this hyper-curation to take place, but actively seek it.
SOS_19-11
Raise the Bar
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Ananya
Patel
SOS_19
This project subverts this by imagining a Malt March – a fictional demonstration against the hypocrisy of the prohibition law. Referencing Gandhi’s 1930 Salt March, the idea for a Malt March was conceived by anti-prohibition activists years ago, but never garnered enough support to actually take place.
SOS_19-12
Libraries
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Shakera
Rahman
SOS_19
A place where the luxuries of anonymity, freedom and possibility still remain, 10 years later. This place is the library. This project explores how libraries can adapt and expand their functions to meet the needs of a changing future through the life of a character that visits the library almost everyday.
SOS_19-13
Humanoid Semiotics
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Lauryn
Siegel
SOS_19
The massive rise in access to 3D technology has impacted both commercial and creative culture immeasurably over the past decade. What started mainly in the architecture, gaming and high-level animation world has trickled down via computing power such that anyone with a computer can participate in our collective fascination with the “uncanny valley.” Nowhere is this more true than in our ability to represent, amend and animate representations of the body. But the visual identities that occupy this space are still subject to the idealized male gaze of those who create most of these softwares. This project, Inspired by Hal Fisher’s “Gay Semiotics” work, takes into consideration the “default” characters, many of which are served up for free in software packages and on the myriad 3D model sites. If you search for “woman” you routinely have options that are clearly the result of male fantasy rather than actual women. This is simultaneously exciting and disturbing.
SOS_19-14
TYST
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Juli
Sikorska
SOS_19
In London alone, more than 1.6 million people are exposed to road traffic noise levels during the day above 55 dB, the level defined by the WHO as causing health problems (the volume of a dishwasher). Reducing noise may provide a significant benefit towards reducing the health related costs of road traffic noise in a community. But how will we deal with sustained growth in highway, rail, and air traffic? Do we find remedies for noise, or stop it at its source?
SOS_19-15
Queering the Data
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Oliver
Simpson
SOS_19
As Yuval Noah Harari wrote: “(in the future) People will not be able to escape persecution by retreating back into the closet, because new technologies are breaking it apart”. This project maps these predicition algorithms in order to identify hacks that break the data chain, or, Queer the data. Four leaflets correspond to the four data chains mapped out through research.
SOS_19-16
Tourism of The Occupation
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Tareq
Tamimi
SOS_19
Digital tourism dominates the market of tourism and as a consequence, plays a major role in determining the way we experience regions around the globe. This year, platforms such as Airbnb and TripAdvisor, have been accused of profiting from “war crimes” by listing accommodations, activities and attractions in Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. This investigation attempts to shed light on the role of tourism platforms in normalizing and obscuring human rights violations towards Bedouin communities.
SOS_19-17
Factories with Fences
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Felix
Taylor
SOS_19
Evidence shows the chance of being incarcerated is largely economically determined. Simultaneously, recent governments have sought to privatise the prison system, turning it's growing population into a productive and cheap labour force. But what objects are actually produced in these factories? Such information is not readily available, this investigation sought to excise this data and explore Designs complicity within their production.
SOS_19-18
Post-Fordist Workout
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Simo
Tse
SOS_19
The boundaries between work and workout have been assimilated; fitness equals productivity. One could easily see the correlation between the patented work station at Amazon’s warehouses, known as the ‘Amazon Cage’, with modular gym equipment. Amazon’s slogan, “Work hard. Have fun. Make History.” goes with fitness phrases such as “Nothing will work unless you do”, or “Exercise till your body behaves.”
SOS_19-19
Smart Borders
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Henry
Valori
SOS_19
Smart Borders appropriates the technology of border security at the scale of the home. Through replacing the front door with transparent methods of border surveillance, this project amplifies the absurd surrender of privacy common to increasingly detailed security checks, and predicts a translucent future of home security neurosis.
SOS_19-20
Only Nelson Nose
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Lizzie
Walkden
SOS_19
Horatio Nelson is considered a naval hero, a genius and “Immortal”. His victories are considered so important to the history of Britain that he has stood in view for the past 176 years, a monument to all that he has done. Only Nelson Nose, is a mockery of Lord Nelson to create discussion of visibility, transparency and accountability in the public sphere.
SOS_19-21
Casper Digital Suicide Support
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Huidi
Xiang
SOS_19
Is it possible to decouple the digital and physical self? Can we ever be free from our data defined cyber shadow? The project intends to dissect contemporary power structures of data usage, data transparency, data accessibility, and data democratization under the overbearing absurdity of our digital status quo.